How the evolution of IT infrastructures supports healthcare

31-Aug-2022

Alan Hayward, sales and marketing manager at SEH Technology, explores how modern network infrastructures are opening up opportunities for healthcare providers

As technology use within the health service increases, so does the need for high-performing IT network that are scalable and flexible

As technology use within the health service increases, so does the need for high-performing IT network that are scalable and flexible

It’s no secret that the pace of digital transformation has sped up across a number of industries, and the healthcare sector is no different.

Today, legacy healthcare systems are no longer able to keep pace with the demands of modern functionalities and connectivity, limiting the ability to support innovative business models.

As a result, modernisation is vital to the future of healthcare, in line with the need for high-performing IT networks that are flexible and can be scaled on demand.

Performance is a key factor for businesses in healthcare as increasing access to patient data is critical to improving resilience and business continuity requirements.

Security is also paramount, as moving workloads and data to different applications often means adhering to a variety of security requirements.

Technology is evolving at a rapid rate, and the healthcare industry needs to keep up with these changes in order to unlock the value that improved infrastructures will bring to their business

Many healthcare organisations are now putting network modernisation at the centre of their forward thinking, with around 43% of providers in Europe investing in emerging IT infrastructures, according to IDC.

A modern network infrastructure opens up opportunities for healthcare providers to move forward in their digital transformation journey and leverage new trends in the ecosystem, including virtual health and workflow optimisation.

Supporting virtual health

The COVID-19 pandemic was a catalyst for the expansion of virtual health. But this trend is set to stay in line with new patient expectations and the rise of new virtual care delivery models across the industry.

Consumers continue to benefit from the convenience of seamless, virtual, and quality healthcare experiences, where they can gain advice on any medical condition and receive the appropriate care.

As a result, the sector has seen an acceleration in the deployment of virtual visits, chatbot assessments, and remote health monitoring.

Ongoing virtual observation of patients with data capture through wearables and AI data analysis can help healthcare professionals improve care over time and predict patient outcomes

Looking ahead, digitally-enabled remote care will drive a 70% growth in spending on connected health technologies by 2023.

And, at the centre of this infrastructure is AI, as it continues to enhance clinical insights and enable better care for more patients, despite limited staff and network resources.

Ongoing virtual observation of patients with data capture through wearables and AI data analysis can help healthcare professionals improve care over time and predict patient outcomes.

Introducing workflow optimisation

The evolution of IT infrastructures has also enabled healthcare organisations to better manage a vast amount of data quickly, as well as data transition and delivery to optimise workflows.

From managing the most-simple tasks to extremely-complex processes, optimising these workflows can help reduce waste and improve resource utilisation to ensure healthcare organisations run more efficiently.

This will also have a direct impact on both the quality and quantity of patient care, boosting patient outcomes and the overall experience.

Many healthcare organisations are prioritising the modernisation of traditional workloads. But, in order to do this, they need to simplify everyday tasks and identify any inefficiencies, bottlenecks or redundant work.

And technology has a big part to play in this as it enhances operational efficiencies by managing the virtual environments and redefining workflows with minimal disruption to the business.

Once this has been established, workflow management needs to be rolled out across the whole organisation to keep processes consistent and effective for everyone.

Digitally-enabled remote care will drive 70% growth in spending on connected healthcare technologies by 2023, experts predict

Digitally-enabled remote care will drive 70% growth in spending on connected healthcare technologies by 2023, experts predict

Driving success with modernisation

While modernising an IT infrastructure enables businesses to pivot in today’s digital landscape, it also brings a host of benefits to healthcare organisations that could not have been previously realised with legacy systems.

A modern network infrastructure opens up opportunities for healthcare providers to move forward in their digital transformation journey and leverage new trends in the ecosystem

The first is a deduction in long-term operational costs as the average spending for new technologies is significantly lower than legacy systems that require ongoing maintenance.

With newer and more-efficient infrastructures, businesses can think long-term and provide a higher quality of service.

Whether it's compiling a simple report, uploading files, or sending off an application, healthcare professionals can process these tasks faster and with fewer disruptions to their workflow.

Organisations will also benefit from increased reliability as advanced infrastructures enable better disaster recovery and business continuity during any downtime, allowing applications across healthcare institutions to be recovered quickly with limited disruption.

Technology is evolving at a rapid rate, and the healthcare industry needs to keep up with these changes in order to unlock the value that improved infrastructures will bring to their business.

There are a number of tools available that can be used to accelerate healthcare’s digital transformation and establish a more-efficient and effective system that benefits both patients and healthcare professionals.

Ultimately, the acceleration of IT network infrastructure modernisation is the bedrock for organisations to thrive in the future of healthcare.

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